A memory or emotion can be triggered by so many things. A smell, a place, a season of the year, a color, or even a piece of artwork. The colorful folk art of The Moore Family has that effect on people. Maybe it’s the vibrant colors of vintage soda cans, the tactile bottle tops in every huge of the rainbow, or perhaps the intricate work that goes into each piece.

I’ve always been of the sentimental type, and have always had a very close connection to recycled art. As a little girl my Grandma was a crafter, she would sew Christmas tree skirts and stockings and make ornaments. I on the other hand would create mixed media recycled art. She had a craft room and my sister and I were allowed to make art once our homework was done after school each day. I was always tinkering with old glass jars, scraps of fabric, bottle caps, cardboard, broken toys, yarn, string, and paint.

The amazing collection of colorful bottle caps and cans turned into art by the Moore Family has me wondering about where those bottle and cans have been in the past? It’s fun to wonder if they were at a summer bbq pool party, in somebodies school lunch or even drank by a famous person! You just never know, and letting your mind wander with recycled materials that have a past is so magical to me.

Without a doubt what captured me most was the story behind their beautiful art. The many hands involved in bringing these pieces of folk art to life, the entire family of 7, all have a part in bringing to life hundreds of vibrant fish, birds, animals, flowers, guitars and more every year.

The amount of detail, love and joy that goes into each piece can be felt when you see it! They sell their art in states across the country and have a spectacular social media feed where they are always sharing not only the latest creations, but the process of making them which is such a treat to see!

If you’re looking for an amazing piece of folk art full of soul to hang on a gallery wall in your home, check out their website and shop below,  any colorful folk art piece from them is sure to be a real conversation starter in your home for years to come.

Website: www.themoorefamilyfolkart.com
Blog: www.themoorefamilyfolkart.com 
Shop: http://www.themoorefamilyfolkart.com/p/store.html
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/themoorefamilyfolkart/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/themoorefamilyfolkart
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/themoorefamilyfolkart

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Can you tell us about your work, when did you start creating?

I started creating art and functional sculptures with upcycled materials at a very young age.  In my elementary years I used trash to make homes for my Lego people and race tracks for my cars.  Art was always an interest in middle and high school.  My favorite classes were drafting, shop, and art.

In college and early marriage, I took somewhat of a break from creating.  In my young 30’s I experienced a revival of sorts and started working with upcycled items and paint, continuing to develop my own style of folk art.

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About 8 years ago art turned from a family hobby to family business as we started shifting styles into paintless folk art – primarily using bottle caps, vintage beer/soda cans, as well as salvaged woods.

My kids have been involved in the art business the last decade going from helpers to emerging artists.  Almost all the pieces we make now every Moore has had their hand in creating in some way, shape, or form – each piece is a team effort.

Moore family folk art colorful recycled art

How would you describe your home decor style? 

Our art lives in a world between fine art and craft.  So fine craft is a good way to describe it.  We find ourselves in the outsider/folk art genre.  Sometimes other terms are used as well – mixed media or upcycled art.

What inspires you when you get in a rut?

I approach ruts in primarily two ways.  1. There is no such thing as ruts – There is no time for ruts – turn up the music, lock your self in the studio, and work, work, work despite any desire not to.  2.  Ruts happen!  Take a week off from creating.

Moore family recycled upcycled folk art

Stepping away from the studio often helps me to feel refreshed and rejuvenated.  Since we create art that results in income for our family, breaks from art are not frequent, they are a luxury.  No art sales – bills don’t get paid.  But I am still a firm believer in stepping back every now and then.

What colors do you enjoy using in your art the most and why?

If I were to pick a few favorite colors – light blue and turquoise remind me of the beach from our home state of Florida.  Hot pink is another favorite – reminds me of the 1980s/1990s.  I used to have a hot pink and yellow wetsuit for surfing back in the day.

Moore family folk art recycled bottle cap art

Where do you create most of your work, what is your space like? 

We create at home in our two car garage studio.  The front side of the studio houses all our salvaged woods, saws, and other larger upcycled items.  This front area (and the drive way) is where we do all our carpentry – for the backdrops of our work.  The back side of the studio is where we create.

Moore family folk art denver colorado

We store about 900 of our vintage soda and beer cans in this area, displayed on the long wall.  We also have bins where we organize all of our bottle caps.  We keep about 250,000 bottle caps in stock.  It’s great to have over 450 square feet dedicated to the creation of our work.

Name 3 crafters, artists or designers that you follow and love their work. 

We love Denver, CO muralist and street artist Anthony Garcia Sr (Instagram @birdseedanthony)

Andy Saczynski (Grayton Beach, FL) is a family favorite – folk contemporary art with a mellow beachy vibe – Alan and Andy grew up surfing together back in high school.  (Instagram @andysaczynski )

Alea Bone (Instagram @aleabone) of Portland, OR is an amazing upcycled artist we adore – her new collection of butterflies are gorgeous.

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What are your favorite items decorating your home and why?

Our home decor is nothing like the art we make.  We keep the home very neutral.  Lori and I love interior design – currently in our house you can find – pampas grass, botanical paintings, 1950s hutches and armoires, lots of oversized glass jars, subtly patterned throws and pillows.  Our home decor style has a very minimalist, upcycled, and antiquey look to it.